Why Are People Afraid of Public Speech?

Everyone has probably faced the necessity to pronounce a speech in front of an audience. Everybody studied at school and presented numerous projects or perhaps sang in a college choir. Some people remain totally calm when they were to speak in public, but there are the ones who start feeling funny even the day before their speech or performance.

Public speeches are the necessary part of many professions, but may people still are afraid to speak in front of a group of other people. To help such individuals to cope with that problem it is sensible to find out where does it come from.

According to the results of various researches the fear of public speech takes the second place in the list of human phobias after the fear of death. The data got by the US specialists show that in the USA the fear of speech occupies the first place. Maybe the average American citizen would rather prefer to die than speaking in public.

  • In the pre-historic times when people lived in communities the power of unity was the one protecting them from weather and dangerous animals. When someone was driven away from the community he became easily vulnerable. When we feel that distance between the audience and ourselves we experience the ancient fear to become an outcast.

  • The settings from childhood also play an important role. When the parents don’t allow their children to scream, cry of sing the muscular tension of the vocal cords will appear in a completely different situation later. Such people speak hoarsely in public or lose their voice.
  • The habit to store the negative emotions and avoiding the release of psychological tension has the negative effects on a persons vocal cords as well. The muscular block prevents the tiny muscles of you throat from relaxing. That usually happens if a person often holds back his or her tears.
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